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Pupil Premium


Kingsweston School

Pupil Premium Report

2018-19

Introduction

Excellence is at the heart of all of Kingsweston’s work, ensuring that pupils receive the very best opportunities to develop the skills to become a successful learner - engagement, resilience, thinking and independence. The school strives to ensure that this happens through robust yet creative and innovative practice.

Lessons at Kingsweston are purposeful, personalised and enjoyable. Teachers and a committed team of support staff (along with the support of the rest of our school community) all help pupils to feel valued, secure and motivated to learn.

We are aware that social disadvantage may affect those pupils who receive free school meals. We also recognise a further group of pupils who may be socially disadvantaged despite not being registered for free school meals. Pupil Premium funding is therefore used strategically, holistically and in line with the vision, values and ethos of the school to support pupils in key areas whilst ensuring that progress is monitored, challenged and supported accordingly.

The Government introduced the Pupil Premium Grant in April 2011. This grant, which is additional to core school funding, is seen by the government as the best way to address the underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most. Schools can decide how most of the Pupil Premium (PP) is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.

Barriers to Educational Achievement

At Kingsweston School we want to ensure we are effective in supporting the aspirational aims identified in the Education Health and Care Plans (EHCP)/Statement for each pupil. Barriers to learning are also identified in each pupil’s EHCP/Statement and for our diverse pupil population these may include obstacles which impact upon:

  • Personal Development and Behaviour
  • Independence Skills
  • Communication and Interaction Skills
  • Cognition and Learning
  • Social Interaction and wellbeing
  • Engagement
  • Sensory Integration

The priorities we establish for our Pupil Premium expenditure reflect this diversity of need and make a contribution towards our capacity to meet each of them.

The barriers to educational achievement referenced above may occur singly or, more often, in combination to complicate the learning processes in which our pupils engage in the course of each day at school. Our staff have a wealth of knowledge and experience which is effective at ameliorating these barriers given each pupils starting point. So whilst we will look to evidence of progress in English and maths as an indicator of the progress our pupils have made, there is a broader context of barriers to learning which have been successfully addressed and which have, in turn, made the progress in these core areas possible. For example, a pupil who began his journey with us requiring a bespoke timetable displaying high anxiety, demand avoidance and very low resilience now is part of the whole school community and accessing all aspects of the school day with peers. Following intensive relationship building and 1:1 support he no longer requires an Individual Risk Assessment and has increased his self-esteem. He has taken part in wider community events such as the Panathlon, Swimming gala and a bowling competition where he took instructions from another lead person at the venue, showed patience in waiting and turn taking, and also coped with disappointment when the sporting action wasn’t perfect. It was wonderful to see him congratulate another school member from the winning school. Another pupil was able to move from requiring a Positive Support Plan and Individual Risk Assessment to successfully starting a college place in September 2018. This was due initially to being able to offer intensive support in a small class setting. He was then able to further develop his confidence, self-esteem and social skills through participating in the LDD Community Post 16 activity group. He also had the opportunity to further his coping and social skills as part of a transition programme for Post 19 placement by attending the weekly college link at Ashley Down.

Pupil Premium Breakdown 2017 - 2018

Grant £50,270

Item/Service/Staff

Amount

Percentage of Grant

(Proportion of) Therapist providing counselling support and intervention. (Reference; wellbeing, social interaction, engagement, personal development and behaviour).

£15,081

30%

(Proportion of) Pastoral and safeguarding Mentor. (Reference; wellbeing, supporting attendance, and engagement).

£10,054

20%

(Proportion of) Additional targeted support staff (TA & SMSA). (Reference; all potential obstacles to learning).

£8,043

16%

(Proportion of) Transition Support worker. (Reference; Personal development, behaviour, wellbeing and engagement).

£7,541

15%

(Proportion of) Music therapy. (Reference; wellbeing, communication and interaction skills, social interaction and engagement).

£7,038

14%

(Proportion of) Sensory Integration Occupational Therapy provision. (Reference; sensory integration needs).

£2,513

5%

 

£50,270

100%

 

Data Summary 2017/18

English, Overall  

Target Missed

Target Met

Target Exceeded

Met + Exceeded

Receives PP  

4%

56%

40%

96%

Most Able PP*

                  2%

55%

43%

98%

Does not receive PP  

1%

45%

54%

99%

Maths, Overall  

Target Missed

Target Met

Target Exceeded

Met + Exceeded

Receives PP  

                   5%

51%

44%

95%

Most Able PP*

4%

49%

47%

96%

Does not receive PP  

4%

54%

42%

96%

 

Summative Evaluation for 2017/18 against Agreed Priorities for the Year

2017/18 Priority

Evaluation

To sustain the wellbeing, engagement and learning of young people in a context of diminishing resources.

The outcomes for all groups of pupils lie well within the definition of ‘outstanding’ agreed by governors. We know the individual pupil targets demonstrated our high expectations. We know that our systems and processes support the early identification of potential underperformance. This allows us to adjust our practices to address this and when we do then this typically has a positive impact upon outcomes.

To continue to support and promote a culture and skill set which enables staff to see the world ‘through the eyes of the child’, thus being attuned to preferred engagement styles, arousal levels and motivations.

The combined efforts of the leadership team, the Family and Systemic Therapist and the staff group itself have led to an increasingly secure and consistent set of values, relationships and every day behaviours. These enable adults to support each child/young person to develop their self-awareness, emotional intelligence, emotional regulation and their resilience, so enabling them to be in a state of readiness to learn.

To support staff in meeting the complexity of need presented by many pupils through the provision of prioritised therapists.

There have been a number of key therapeutic influences upon staff in the course of the last year. The contribution of the Family and Systemic Therapist has been fundamental to our capacity to secure high quality and informed provision for a number of our young people. Of equal significance has been the supervision provided by this member of the team to relevant staff.

Other therapeutic inputs have had a positive impact upon pupils at the individual level, and successful aspects of their practice has been shared with teams, so adding to their ‘toolbox’ of strategies when working with others.

The work of the Transition Support Worker had a significantly positive impact in supporting young people and their families in 2017/18. Following his retirement at the end of the academic year the role has been subject to changes which reflect the changing EHCP context and the school’s response to these, making future support available in a way which builds upon what went before and enhances our EHCPs and Careers Education, Information and Guidance Provision for 2018/19 and beyond.

Priorities for Pupil Premium 2018-19

To maintain and build upon the outstanding outcomes for pupils in receipt of the Pupil Premium and those in care.

  • To reduce the gap in achievement between Pupil Premium and non-Pupil Premium pupils within the SLD Strand to no more than 2%. (Note: data presented above is whole school aggregated data; equivalent strand based data has been shared via the Information and Data Report 2017-18).
  • To maintain outstanding outcomes for pupils in receipt of the Pupil Premium across an enhanced range of measures currently being developed as a part of the revisions to our assessment practices.

To support staff in meeting the complexity of need presented by many pupils through the provision of prioritised therapists.

Proposed Pupil Premium Breakdown 2018 - 2019

Provisional Grant £51,425

Item/Service/Staff (plus area(s) of learning being supported)

Amount

Percentage

(Proportion of) Therapists providing counselling support and intervention.

(Reference; wellbeing, social interaction, engagement and personal development and behaviour).

£15,100

29%

(Proportion of) Pastoral and safeguarding Mentor. (Reference; wellbeing, supporting attendance, and engagement).

£10,500

20%

(Proportion of) Additional targeted support staff (TA & SMSA). (Reference; all potential obstacles to learning).

£8,600

17%

(Proportion of) Music therapy. (Reference; wellbeing, communication and interaction skills, social interaction and engagement).

£7,500

15%

(Proportion of) Sensory Integration provision. (Reference; sensory integration needs).

£5,225

10%

(Proportion of) Transition Support. (Reference; Personal development and behaviour, wellbeing and engagement).

£4,500

9%

 

£51,425

100.00%